Brutalism in European schools and universities, photographed by Stefano Perego


Brutalism in European schools and universities, photographed by Stefano Perego

In his book “The New Brutalism in Architecture: Ethics or Aesthetics? ” Reyner Banham establishes what he considers the semantic roots of the term “Brutalism”, explaining that it comes from one of the ” undeniable turning points in architecture, the construction of Le Corbusier’s concrete masterpiece, the Unit of Marseille. It was Corbusier’s own word for rough or plastered concrete, “Gross cement,which made brutalism a mainstay of architectural jargon and, in many ways, the term, as well as the architecture it described, flourishedIn the book, Banham highlights the historical milestone marked by Corbusier’s Housing Unit and the socio-political context that shaped it. exposed concrete became the preferred building material within the burgeoning Brutalist movement, which was quickly defined by its rough and rough surfaces and dramatic geometric shapes.

Similar to other forms of architecture, school buildings– even if linked to certain socio-economic and political factors – are influenced by the architectural styles of their respective periods. Combine this with their propensity for monumentality, educational institutions around the world have turned to brutalism to define their aesthetics and showcase their “institutionalism. “In keeping with the Brutalist tradition, reinforced concrete is the building material of choice, lending all kinds of shapes and textures to these learning centers.

Along with his work for the articles Brutalism and Collective Life in Europe and Brutalist Churches and Chapels of Europe, photographer Stefano Perego has also covered Brutalism as seen in educational institutions including universities, primary and secondary schools, institutes, high schools and university libraries. In this article, we shed light on some of these institutions from across Europe, namely Germany, Belgium, Italy, France, the Netherlands and Switzerland, and the people who support them, especially architects Gerd Hänska, Rolf Gutbrod, Enrico Castiglioni, Hermann Fehling, Daniel Gogel, Christoph Parade, Brigitte Parade, Walter Schrempf, Georges Adilon, Guido Canella, Michele Achilli, Daniele Brigidini and Johannes Van den Broek, among others:

Germany

High school (Auditorium Hückelhoven), Christoph Parade and Brigitte Parade

  • Year: 1963-1974
  • Location: Hückelhoven, Germany
Lycée (Auditorium Hückelhoven), Christoph Parade and Brigitte Parade.  Image © Stefano Perego
Lycée (Auditorium Hückelhoven), Christoph Parade and Brigitte Parade. Image © Stefano Perego

Cologne University Library, Rolf Gutbrod

  • Year: 1964-1968
  • Location: Cologne, Germany
Library of the University of Cologne, Rolf Gutbrod.  Image © Stefano Perego
Library of the University of Cologne, Rolf Gutbrod. Image © Stefano Perego

Institute of Hygiene and Microbiology of the Free University of Berlin, Hermann Fehling and Daniel Gogel

  • Year: 1966-1974
  • Location: Berlin, germany
Institute of Hygiene and Microbiology of the Free University of Berlin, Hermann Fehling and Daniel Gogel.  Image © Stefano Perego
Institute of Hygiene and Microbiology of the Free University of Berlin, Hermann Fehling and Daniel Gogel. Image © Stefano Perego

Institute for Research in Experimental Medicine, Gerd Hänska

  • Year: 1969-1972
  • Location: Berlin, germany
Institute for Research in Experimental Medicine, Gerd Hänska.  Image © Stefano Perego
Institute for Research in Experimental Medicine, Gerd Hänska. Image © Stefano Perego

University canteen of the Saarland, Walter Schrempf and Otto Herbert Hajek

  • Year: 1966-1970
  • Location: Saarbrücken, Germany
University canteen of the Saarland, Walter Schrempf and Otto Herbert Hajek.  Image © Stefano Perego
University canteen of the Saarland, Walter Schrempf and Otto Herbert Hajek. Image © Stefano Perego

France

Sainte-Marie Lycée Lyon, Georges Adilon

  • Year: 1976
  • Location: La Verpilliere, France
Lycée Sainte-Marie Lyon, Georges Adilon.  Image © Stefano Perego
Lycée Sainte-Marie Lyon, Georges Adilon. Image © Stefano Perego

Italy

“Silvano Fedi” Industrial Technical Institute (Secondary School)

  • Year: 1970
  • Location: Pistoia, Italy
"Silvano fedi" Industrial Technical Institute  "Silvano fedi" (Escuela secundaria).  Image © Stefano Perego
“Silvano Fedi” Industrial Technical Institute “Silvano Fedi” (Escuela secundaria). Image © Stefano Perego

Primary school, Guido Canella, Michele Achilli and Daniele Brigidini

  • Year: 1972-1981
  • Location: Pieve Emanuele, Italy
Primary school, Guido Canella, Michele Achilli and Daniele Brigidini.  Image © Stefano Perego
Primary school, Guido Canella, Michele Achilli and Daniele Brigidini. Image © Stefano Perego

Regina Maria Adelaide Institute in Aosta

  • Year: 1976
  • Location: Aosta, Italy
Regina Maria Adélaïde Institute in Aosta.  Image © Stefano Perego
Regina Maria Adélaïde Institute in Aosta. Image © Stefano Perego

Arturo Tosi State scientific high school, Enrico Castiglioni

  • Year: 1980-1985
  • Location: Busto Arsizio, Italy
Arturo Tosi State Scientific High School, Enrico Castiglioni.  Image © Stefano Perego
Arturo Tosi State Scientific High School, Enrico Castiglioni. Image © Stefano Perego

The Netherlands

Conference room of the Delft University of Technology, Johannes Van den Broek and Jaap Bakema

  • Year: 1966
  • Location: Delft, Netherlands
Conference room of the Delft University of Technology, Johannes Van den Broek and Jaap Bakema.  Image © Stefano Perego
Conference room of the Delft University of Technology, Johannes Van den Broek and Jaap Bakema. Image © Stefano Perego

Stefano Perego (1984) is an architectural photographer based in Milan, Italy. He frequently collaborates with architectural studios as well as with artists and is the co-author of the book SOVIET ASIA (Modern Soviet Architecture of Central Asia). His interest in the architecture of the second half of the 20th century was central to his photographs capturing modernist, brutalist and postmodern works.





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