Marseille Culture – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ Mon, 21 Jun 2021 17:10:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://mact-asso.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Marseille Culture – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ 32 32 the French far right tests the appetite of voters in regional elections | Voice of America https://mact-asso.org/the-french-far-right-tests-the-appetite-of-voters-in-regional-elections-voice-of-america/ Sun, 20 Jun 2021 11:49:22 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/the-french-far-right-tests-the-appetite-of-voters-in-regional-elections-voice-of-america/ PARIS – French voters went to the polls on Sunday for regional elections that will test the attractiveness of the softened image of far-right leader Marine Le Pen with less than a year before the next presidential election. After a grueling year and a half of closures, curfews and restrictions, Sunday’s first round is set […]]]>


PARIS – French voters went to the polls on Sunday for regional elections that will test the attractiveness of the softened image of far-right leader Marine Le Pen with less than a year before the next presidential election.

After a grueling year and a half of closures, curfews and restrictions, Sunday’s first round is set to prove disastrous for President Emmanuel Macron, whose party is not expected to win any of mainland France’s 13 regions.

Spurred on by a resurgence of public order issues during the campaign, despite the fact that French regions lack police powers, Le Pen hopes to capitalize on a rebranding that saw its promises of “Frexit” and its incendiary rhetoric abandoned.

“It appears less extreme in the eyes of the French, less dangerous for democracy, than it was a decade ago,” Brice Teinturier, an analyst at the IPSOS pollster, told Reuters.

The best chance for his National Rally party is in the south of France, the region around Marseille and Nice, where one of Le Pen’s lieutenants, a former Conservative minister, is cast by an opinion poll as the winner of the race even if all parties are mobilizing against him.

Winning a region, for the first time, would give Le Pen a boost within a year of the presidential elections, and would be a slap in the face for Macron, who presented himself as a bulwark against the far right.

“If the choice is indeed made between the National Rally and the center-right, like Mr. Macron, personally I will not vote. [in the presidential elections]61-year-old director Emmanuel Barraud told Reuters outside a Paris polling station.

“I think we have to accept that the game is over, and we have to start preparing for the future and the future is rebuilding a true left party.”

Low participation

The turnout at noon was one of the lowest in the history of the French elections, at just 12.2%, against 16.3% in 2015.

The far-right should also do well in two other regions, around Calais in the north and in Burgundy, helped by low participation in a country whose attention is focused on the summer holidays to forget the pandemic.

In the north, the outgoing president and favorite to become the conservatives’ presidential candidate, Xavier Bertrand, is facing Le Pen’s party spokesman and Macron’s justice minister.

Whether Macron’s party hits the 10% threshold will determine whether he can force Bertrand to form an alliance to defeat the far right, which would undermine his case as Macron’s chief opponent in 2022.

However, a victory for Bertrand would strengthen his chances of becoming the Conservatives’ presidential candidate. Macron’s aides see the former health minister as a rival who would erode the president’s center-right electoral base.

The results of Sunday’s first round will send the parties on a frantic backstage for two days to forge alliances ahead of the June 27 final round.

“I came to vote so that totalitarian parties like France Insoumise [far-left], or the Greens or the National Rally, don’t win, ”said Vincent Thomas, a 52-year-old artist who also voted in Paris.



Source link

]]>
Here’s where you can stay in France this summer as it reopens for tourists https://mact-asso.org/heres-where-you-can-stay-in-france-this-summer-as-it-reopens-for-tourists/ Sat, 19 Jun 2021 08:28:54 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/heres-where-you-can-stay-in-france-this-summer-as-it-reopens-for-tourists/ France officially reopened its doors to (vaccinated) international travelers – and not too soon, say travel agents, who immediately found themselves scrambling to meet demand. “We are already seeing availability problems in July and August,” said Philip Haslet, co-founder of French travel specialist Kairos, speaking from his home in Provence. “It’s the busiest I think […]]]>


France officially reopened its doors to (vaccinated) international travelers – and not too soon, say travel agents, who immediately found themselves scrambling to meet demand. “We are already seeing availability problems in July and August,” said Philip Haslet, co-founder of French travel specialist Kairos, speaking from his home in Provence. “It’s the busiest I think I’ve ever been.”

This is good news for the travel industry, which faces a year and a half of deficits. But for travelers, that leaves a lot to unravel; some run short stays at multiple resorts to bypass reservation dates and other restrictions. Combine that with the fact that many of France’s most exciting hotel openings are yet to come, and there may be good reasons to (briefly) delay a visit.

Plus, says Haslet, August is still expected to be relatively calm amid typical summer shutdowns in Paris and beyond. “It’s France,” he exclaims. There may be fewer businesses shutting down for the month, “but I’m afraid the underlying Gallic DNA is triggered.”

Not that there is never a bad time to visit France. So whether it’s in the near future or after the dust has settled, here are the hotels to prioritize … assuming you can get in.

Around cities

Airelles Chateau de Versailles, Le Grand Controle In the closed enclosure of the emblematic estate of Louis XIV and opposite its famous Orangerie is Le Grand Controle, a complex of three buildings which once housed dignitaries and which has recently been reborn into a luxury hotel of 14 rooms. This is the first time that related commoners, not courtiers, have been able to sleep within the storied walls of the palace, a privilege that allows them early morning access to the gardens and to visit the Hall of Mirrors after hours. opening. The sumptuous period-inspired rooms give the impression of a journey back in time to the 18th century. But the Alain Ducasse restaurant, the Valmont spa and the sophisticated geothermal heating system that were installed during the multi-year renovation remind you that 2021 is a golden era in its own right. Rooms starting at $ 2,000.

Saint James ParisImagine the quintessential French country house, then drop it off in the 16th arrondissement a few minutes walk from the Trocadéro or the Arc de Triomphe, which is wrapped according to the design of the (late) artist Christo in September. That’s what you get at Saint James, which opens with 50 rooms and a membership club on July 1. The gracious estate was once an elite school, and its gardens occupy a former hot-air balloon launching pad; now it will have an ambitious restaurant run by Ducasse’s protégé Julien Dumas and enough space for guests to go horseback riding or cycling. For the ultimate urban oasis book, the Pavillon d’Amour, a self-contained triplex chalet with its own steam room and elaborate fountain up front. Rooms starting at $ 535.

Tuba Club, Marseille You would think this chic five-room inn, run by the owners of a popular restaurant that shares its name, was on its own private island in the middle of the sea. The opposite is true. Of course, it is located on a rocky outcrop with daybeds under the Mediterranean sun. And yes, the house dish, “Linguini Tuba”, is coated in a clam sauce that smells of the Italian Riviera. But Tuba is actually perched on the edge of a fishing enclave on the outskirts of Marseille, a vibrant cultural capital that’s poised to surpass its reputation as France’s second city. Even with the traffic, you’re only 30 minutes from the Old Port, where you’ll find the Mucem Art and Architecture Museum, with its hit summer show Jeff Koons. Rooms starting at $ 200.

New campaign classics

La Maison d’Estournel, Bordeaux The original tenant of this large Haut-Médoc estate, Louis Gaspard, was one of the first Bordeaux wine exporters, sending cases for distribution to India in the early 1800s. under the careful management of Michel Reybier Hospitality, a group which also owns La Réserve in Paris, Gaspard’s legacy is preserved intact. You’ll notice its influence in the house’s 14 bedrooms and many common areas, from a secret basement cellar (now available for wine tastings) to its sprawling vineyards and subcontinent-inspired decor. Make friends with the concierge, who can organize tours of premier grand cru vineyards, cooking classes at local houses, or lunch with oyster farmers along the charming shore of the Arcachon Basin. And expect to treat yourself. Bordeaux is perhaps best known for its grapes, but it is the region that gives us foie gras, truffles and some of the best produce in France. The House highlights all of this whenever it has the opportunity. Rooms starting at $ 300.

Les Sources de Cheverny, Loire Valley No one does bucolic luxury like the French, and nowhere is this clearer than Les Sources de Cheverny, a 49-room chateau that draws its ethereal design from the ancient forest that surrounds it. ‘surrounded. The location is convenient for Cheverny and Chambord, but the hotel is a destination in itself, with yoga classes in the woods, a spa that offers ‘crushed cabernet scrubs’ and open-air thermal baths, as well as a wine bar in the former domain of the estate. cellar that favors lesser-known local grape varieties. Rooms starting at $ 240.

Le Domaine du Mas de Pierre, Provence The home car of this fully renovated 75-room resort is a Rolls-Royce, but most guests choose to drive around the property – and the surrounding quaint town – with a fleet of homemade electric bikes. It’s Le Domaine du Mas de Pierre Resort & Spa in a nutshell, with various luxury touches for many types of guests. For families, there’s a free kids’ club that accepts kids three and up, with a bouncy castle and gardening workshops. For nature lovers, there is an equestrian center and the possibility of canyoning or paragliding. And for the sybarites, there is a fragrance garden, aviary, and four restaurants that draw ingredients from the aforementioned on-site garden. There is no better place to choose your own adventure. Rooms starting at $ 275.

Hotel Lou Pinet, Saint-Tropez travel specialist Haslet, says this hotel alone made Saint-Tropez relevant again, contrary to any impression that the destination was resting on its laurels or that it would be better suited for one or two nights. getaways to simply soak in excess. This is because the Lou Pinet Hotel has something that many of its neighbors lack: three generations of soul. Family-owned, the hotel has only 34 rooms with eclectic design, inspired by artists such as Picasso and Cézanne. Its soundtrack is more cicadas than electronica, the property is planted with fragrant trees (Lou Pinet means “pine” in the local dialect), and the swimming pool is tiled in a romantic shade of egg blue that matches the shutters of the garden. ‘hotel. It all sounds a bit like a ’60s reverie, with Brigitte Bardot glamor to match. Rooms starting at $ 625.

Worth the wait

Those who wish to plan an entire trip around a truly special hotel will have two openings to watch out for in the coming months: the Maybourne Riviera on the French Riviera and the Cheval Blanc Paris, owned by LVMH. Neither has started accepting reservations, but there’s a good chance both will open before summer is over.

The Cheval Blanc project occupies a two-storey building in the 1st arrondissement, right next to the Quai du Louvre. A former department store, it is completely reinvented as a 72-room urban oasis by Peter Marino, all sprayed with a personalized scent designed by Maison Dior’s top nose. It’s LVMH, so Dior will also take care of the spa, where flowery baths will be on the menu; it is expected that there will be many opportunities to showcase the company’s various champagne brands. In typical LVMH style, the business builds a mystery around the finer details, but it’s a business that can always beat the hype.

There is more to chew on with the Maybourne Riviera, literally. A modernist setting of glass and steel near the medieval village of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, it will have 69 rooms facing the sea with access to a series of restaurants designed by the best chefs in the world. Mauro Colagreco, whose three-Michelin-starred Mirazur currently holds the title of Best Restaurant in the World awarded by William Reed Business Media, is in charge of a venue; Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Japanese sushi legend Hiro Sato oversee the others. This is quite appropriate for a hotel group whose crown jewels are the Connaught and Claridge’s.



Source link

]]>
Dinner at the museum: Michelin-starred chefs offer refined cuisine in the cultural highlights of France https://mact-asso.org/dinner-at-the-museum-michelin-starred-chefs-offer-refined-cuisine-in-the-cultural-highlights-of-france/ Sat, 19 Jun 2021 03:56:28 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/dinner-at-the-museum-michelin-starred-chefs-offer-refined-cuisine-in-the-cultural-highlights-of-france/ Image: Shutterstock The two Michelin star chef Jean-François Piège is in charge of Mimosa, the restaurant of the Hôtel de la Marine in Paris, freshly restored, a historic building and an exhibition space. It’s time to visit some of the French museum restaurants, where top chefs serve the best culinary delights for a post-cultural treat. […]]]>


Image: Shutterstock

The two Michelin star chef Jean-François Piège is in charge of Mimosa, the restaurant of the Hôtel de la Marine in Paris, freshly restored, a historic building and an exhibition space. It’s time to visit some of the French museum restaurants, where top chefs serve the best culinary delights for a post-cultural treat.

1. Mimosa at the Hôtel de la Marine, Paris
You will have to wait a little longer to take a seat at the mimosa egg bar by chef Jean-François Trap. The restaurant will open its doors on September 1, 2021. The chef with multiple Michelin stars promises a restaurant with summer flavors, where each bite “sparkles with sunshine and joie de vivre”. We can’t wait!

2. Restaurant Guy Savoy at the Monnaie de Paris
On the banks of the Seine, La Monnaie de Paris hosts the restaurant of the three-star chef and its 13-course tasting menu and its “discovery” menu for lunch. Here, guests can enjoy delicacies including one of the emblematic dishes of Savoyard cuisine: artichoke and truffle soup, served with a brioche spread with truffle butter. It might be wise to visit the institution before your meal …

3. Le Môle Passedat at Mucem, Marseille
With multiple spaces, including a panoramic restaurant, a terrace, a bistro serving its own variations of mezze and food stalls serving quick and tasty bites, there is no doubt that Le Môle Passedat is a hotbed of gastronomic delights. From the top of the Mucem in Marseille, this restaurant offers guests a privileged view of the comings and goings of the boats in the port. This maritime universe is helmed by Gérald Passedat, three Michelin starred for his restaurant Le Petit Nice.

Le Frank at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
Image: Jon Akira Yamamoto / Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images


4. Le Frank at the Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris

Jean-Louis Nomicos took the reins of the restaurant of the Vuitton Foundation, bringing his gastronomic vision to this impressive glass building. The menu changes throughout the day, from breakfast to dinner, with tables for the evening only available by reservation. The chef’s inspirations also adapt to the seasons to fit into the programming of the cultural venue.

5. Michel Bras at the Soulages Museum, Rodez

At the Côté Comptoir, for a snack or a snack, or at the Restaurant, for seasonal cuisine, reinvented every day, Michel Bras has taken up residence at the Soulages Museum in Rodez, to the delight of the taste buds of visitors. The menu is constantly updated based on fresh market produce and offers a starter, three main courses and three desserts.

6. And at La Halle aux Grains, La Bourse de Commerce, Paris

After its eagerly awaited reopening, the Bourse de Commerce now welcomes visitors to the Pinault Collection. And who better than a pioneer of vegetable cuisine, Michel Bras, and his son Sébastien, to offer visitors a menu rich in seeds, cereals and pulses in this former wheat hall? But that doesn’t mean the menus – offering options with three, five, or seven courses – are vegan, as diners will find Aubrac beef alongside stuffed button mushrooms or cod mousse, for example.

Click here to see Forbes India’s full coverage of the Covid-19 situation and its impact on life, business and economy



Source link

]]>
Vanderbilt Joins Peer Group Studying Legacies of Slavery and Racial Injustice | Vanderbilt News https://mact-asso.org/vanderbilt-joins-peer-group-studying-legacies-of-slavery-and-racial-injustice-vanderbilt-news/ Fri, 18 Jun 2021 14:52:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/vanderbilt-joins-peer-group-studying-legacies-of-slavery-and-racial-injustice-vanderbilt-news/ Chancellor Daniel Diermeier (John Russell / Vanderbilt) Vanderbilt University has become the newest member of the Universities Studying Slavery consortium as part of its reinvigorated commitment to tackle racial injustice while working for a more inclusive and welcoming university community. “Vanderbilt’s membership in this consortium demonstrates our commitment to a rigorous study of our institutional […]]]>


Chancellor Daniel Diermeier (John Russell / Vanderbilt)

Vanderbilt University has become the newest member of the Universities Studying Slavery consortium as part of its reinvigorated commitment to tackle racial injustice while working for a more inclusive and welcoming university community.

“Vanderbilt’s membership in this consortium demonstrates our commitment to a rigorous study of our institutional history” Chancellor Daniel Diermeier mentionned. “We recognize the importance of exploring and recognizing the legacy of racial injustice and segregation through rigorous scholarship and research.”

The consortium, created and led by the University of Virginia, began in 2014 with five colleges and universities in Virginia actively seeking their institutional links with the slave trade.

Today, more than 70 institutions work together within the consortium to address historical and contemporary issues related to race and inequalities in academic communities and higher education in general.

Dr. André L. Churchwell, Vice-Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Director of Diversity (Vanderbilt University)

“We look forward to opening up dialogue and engagement with our partner schools as we develop and share best practices related to one of Vanderbilt’s highest priorities: deepening the principles of diversity and inclusion in the workplace. whole university, ”said Dr André L. Churchwell, Vice-Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Director of Diversity. “We will continue to develop a campus culture and programming that makes every member of our community feel welcomed and supported. “

The consortium holds biannual meetings to discuss strategies, collaborate on research, and learn from each other.

Vanderbilt’s faculty lead numerous studies and research projects related to stories of slavery and racial injustice, both in Nashville and across the world.

These include:

Digital Archives of Slave Societies, who has preserved over a million images of endangered ecclesiastical and secular documents related to Africans and people of African descent in slave societies. The archives, founded and managed by Jane lander, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt professor of history, has documented the lives of approximately 6 million free and slave Africans, their descendants, and the Indigenous, European and Asian peoples with whom they interacted.

Postdoctoral Research Fellow Daniel genkins, who is the executive director of digital archives, works with the Data Science Institute to automate the extraction of information from archival archives.

The archive’s collection continues to grow. Emeritus professor of history Marshall Eakin recently concluded a project from the British Library’s Endangered Archives Program that digitized notarized documents in two locations in Paraiba, Brazil. The archives have also funded a new project in Guadalajara, Mexico, and are waiting for their archives to reopen after the pandemic to receive their scanned documents.

Drawing on the work of the digital archives of slave societies, the Transinstitutional Program on the International Initiative for the Study of Slave Societies advanced collaborative research as well as public history and community outreach programs.

Black Nashville Historical Mapping Project, directed by Daniel Sharfstein, Dick and Martha Lansden Professor of Law and History, and Jane Landers. They organized and co-taught the first college course on historic Black Nashville, training students to conduct research in local archives and historic sites.

Landers and Sharfstein are now working with Jim schindling, visiting scholar Vanderbilt, to develop an online map of Historic Black Nashville. Research by professors and students uncovered a free and vibrant pre-Civil War black community that was closed and largely wiped out. They included a Hotel Afrique for black sailors who sailed up and down the Canada River to New Orleans and a free black school that continued to reopen despite racist attacks.

Fort Negley is part of the site visits for students enrolled in the Historic Black Nashville University (Vanderbilt University) course

Mapping Black Litigants and Lenders in the Pre-War South

Kimberly Welch, assistant professor of history, works with Jim Schindling to map black networks drawn from his two book projects. Black litigants in the pre-war south draws on handwritten lower court cases and includes over 1,000 examples of black litigants using the law on their own, often successfully. She now enters the relational data from these court cases into Schindling’s Spatial Historian tool.

Welch will add recordings of his current work, Stability of Fortunes, which recreates the world of black moneylenders in the pre-war southern United States who formed credit relationships with whites and other people of color in New York City; Philadelphia Cream; London; Liverpool, England; Paris; and Marseille, France.

Engine for art, democracy and justice, founded and directed by Marie-Madeleine Campos-Pons, Cornelius Vanderbilt art teacher, offers virtual conversations and artistic collaborations focused on healing, unity and care at a time of significant social unrest in the world. The EADJ’s transinstitutional partners are Fisk University, the First art museum and Millions of conversations. Works by African-American composer Julius Eastman and a large-scale installation by Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama in Fisk were on display this spring.

As part of the Engine for Art, Democracy and Justice programming, students sew together jute bags for an installation by Ibrahim Mahama at Fisk University (Vanderbilt University)

Black lives and liberation series, published by Vanderbilt University Press and co-edited by Brandon Byrd, assistant professor of history. The series has two broad goals: to explore social justice and the activism of black individuals and communities throughout history to the present day, including the Black Lives Matter movement and the evolving ways in which it is articulated and practiced in the African diaspora; and examining everyday life and culture, correcting worn-out “stories” that have excluded or denied the contributions of black individuals and communities or recast them as all-white efforts.

Circum-Atlantic Studies, sponsored by the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities and co-directed by Jane Landers, Daniel Genkins and Theron Corse, professor of history, geography and political science at Tennessee State University, focuses on the themes of Atlantic slavery, colonialism and post-colonialism, most sessions centered on an invited lecture or discussion of a pre-circulated document. The participant research links Africa, Europe, the Americas and the Caribbean, and targets a range of constituencies on campus. The Warren Center also supports the Black Atlantic History Lecture Series, which invites leading Black Atlantic scholars to campus each February to discuss their research and publications.

The Warren Center, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, also offers a series of cross-institutional courses that use the campus as a living laboratory, providing future historians, architects, archaeologists, curators and engineers with unique hands-on experiences. These courses include archaeological digs around campus and archival research on the university, providing students with the opportunity to engage in the rich and complicated history of Vanderbilt and Nashville.

Other Vanderbilt faculty who conduct research focused on the history and modern legacy of slavery include: Celso Castilho, associate professor of history; Dennis dickerson, the Reverend James M. Lawson, professor of history; Teresa goddu, associate professor of English and American studies; Guillaume Louis, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Teacher of Spanish; and Michael R. DeBaun, professor of pediatrics and JC Peterson, MD.



Source link

]]>
Dinner at the museum: Michelin-starred chefs bring gastronomy to the cultural highlights of France | Eat Drink https://mact-asso.org/dinner-at-the-museum-michelin-starred-chefs-bring-gastronomy-to-the-cultural-highlights-of-france-eat-drink/ Thu, 17 Jun 2021 14:02:08 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/dinner-at-the-museum-michelin-starred-chefs-bring-gastronomy-to-the-cultural-highlights-of-france-eat-drink/ On the banks of the Seine, La Monnaie de Paris houses a restaurant run by the three-star chef Guy Savoy. – Photo by Instagram / Guy Savoy PARIS, June 17 – Two Michelin star chef Jean-François Piege is about to run Mimosa, the restaurant of the newly restored Hôtel de la Marine in Paris, a […]]]>


On the banks of the Seine, La Monnaie de Paris houses a restaurant run by the three-star chef Guy Savoy. – Photo by Instagram / Guy Savoy

PARIS, June 17 – Two Michelin star chef Jean-François Piege is about to run Mimosa, the restaurant of the newly restored Hôtel de la Marine in Paris, a historic building and exhibition space. It’s time to visit some of the French museum restaurants, where top chefs serve the best culinary delights for a post-culture treat.

1. Mimosa at the Hôtel de la Marine, Paris

You will have to wait a little longer to take a seat at chef Jean-François Piege’s mimosa egg bar. The restaurant will open its doors on September 1, 2021. The chef with multiple Michelin stars promises a restaurant with summer flavors, where each bite “sparkles with sunshine and joie de vivre”. We can’t wait!

2. Restaurant Guy Savoy at the Monnaie de Paris

On the banks of the Seine, La Monnaie de Paris hosts the restaurant of the three-Michelin-starred chef and its 13-course tasting menu and its “discovery” menu for lunch. You can taste delicacies there, including one of the signature dishes of Savoyard cuisine: artichoke and truffle soup, accompanied by a brioche spread with truffle butter. It might be wise to visit the institution before your meal …

3. Le Mole Passedat at Mucem, Marseille

With multiple spaces, including a panoramic restaurant, terrace, bistro serving its own variations of mezze, and food stalls serving quick and tasty bites, there’s no doubt that Le Mole Passedat is a hotbed of gastronomic delights. From the top of the Mucem in Marseille, this restaurant offers guests a privileged view of the comings and goings of the boats in the port. This maritime universe is helmed by Gérald Passedat, three Michelin starred for his restaurant Le Petit Nice.

4. Le Frank at the Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris

Jean-Louis Nomicos took the reins of the Vuitton Foundation restaurant, bringing his gastronomic vision to this impressive glass building. The menu changes throughout the day, from breakfast to dinner, with tables for the evening only available by reservation. The chef’s inspirations also adapt to the seasons to fit into the programming of the cultural venue.

5. Michel Bras at the Soulages Museum, Rodez

At Côté Comptoir, for a snack or a snack, or at the Restaurant, for seasonal cuisine, reinvented every day, Michel Bras has taken up residence at the Soulages Museum in Rodez, to the delight of the taste buds of visitors. The menu is constantly updated based on fresh market produce and offers a starter, three main courses and three desserts.

6. And at La Halle aux Grains, La Bourse de Commerce, Paris

After its eagerly awaited reopening, the Bourse de Commerce now welcomes visitors to the Pinault Collection. And who better than a pioneer of vegetable cuisine, Michel Bras, and his son Sébastien, to offer visitors a menu rich in seeds, cereals and legumes in this former wheat hall? But that doesn’t mean the menus – offering options with three, five, or seven courses – are vegan, as diners will find Aubrac beef alongside stuffed button mushrooms or cod mousse, for example. – ETX Studio





Source link

]]>
Gariwo’s ambassadors and collaborators at the Jardin des Justes du Monde in Milan https://mact-asso.org/gariwos-ambassadors-and-collaborators-at-the-jardin-des-justes-du-monde-in-milan/ Wed, 16 Jun 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/gariwos-ambassadors-and-collaborators-at-the-jardin-des-justes-du-monde-in-milan/ Yesterday at the Garden of the Righteous of the World in Milan, the annual meeting with Gariwoambassadors and collaborators of took place. As usual, the assembly focused on Gariwothe work of the past year and its future goals and objectives. Gariwo’s work, which is based on a strong educational mission through the figures of the […]]]>


Yesterday at the Garden of the Righteous of the World in Milan, the annual meeting with Gariwoambassadors and collaborators of took place. As usual, the assembly focused on Gariwothe work of the past year and its future goals and objectives. Gariwo’s work, which is based on a strong educational mission through the figures of the Righteous, is increasingly interested in the theme of prevention of genocide.

The assembly began with opening remarks by Gariwothe staff of. Martina Landi, Gariwothe editor-in-chief of, focused on actions taken by Gariwo to enrich its educational mission: “one of the most important activities of this year has been the agreement with CDEC (Fondazione Centro di Documentazione Ebraica Contemporanea): our collaboration aims to promote research on the figures of the Righteous, to organize conferences and seminars for teachers, and to work on educational projects with schools, to promote the fight against anti-Semitism and the dissemination of positive examples with the youngest ”. “This collaboration – said Landi – will have a considerable impact on Gariwoof the education sector ”. Landi also mentioned a new educational project in Gariwo, produced in collaboration with Spostiamo Mari e Monti, an association based in Turin and long-standing partner of Gariwo. The project is based on exchange projects and the training of university teachers who work with high school students in a didactic process leading to the opening of new gardens in schools.

Manuela Rippo, responsible for Gariwothe gardens, described the many ongoing garden projects in Italy and around the world, including the future openings of certain gardens in Stockholm, Marseille, Argentina, Kurdistan Ventotene, and San Patrignano. Rippo also mentioned the requalification of the Garden of the Righteous in Neve Shalom, the ongoing collaboration with the garden of Warsaw, and the future name of the street leading to the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs as “Viale dei Giusti»(Rue des Justes). “The engagement of the ambassadors – said Rippo – was the key to all this: there is a permanent network, which we like to see as a cultural movement based on active citizenship, responsibility and human rights”.

Francesco Cataluccio, writer, Gariwocollaborator of for years, and now his new editorial manager, presented the set Encyclopedia of the Righteous, which Gariwo is currently working on in Italian and will soon be released in English. the Encyclopedia of the Righteous is based on materials that Gariwo has collected over the past few years: it is a digital encyclopedia, which means that it can be seen as an endless work in progress, open to everyone’s contribution. “Our main focus – Cataluccio said – is educational, and we want readers to see the stories of the Righteous as real narratives, getting them to sympathize with these characters.” The choice to include a Righteous, added Cataluccio, always stems from a discussion involving different people and has led us to uncover lesser known and fascinating stories.

Gabriele Nissim, GariwoPresident, closed the opening remarks with an overview of Gariwoactivity and big goals for the future. First, Nissim discussed Gariwoto extend the notion of Righteousness beyond the Shoah, and declared: “Today we must take one more step: we must tighten the knot between the figures of the Righteous and the theme of genocide prevention. The figures of the Righteous must show society that genocide can be prevented and avoided through individual choices and responsibility ”. Nissim also pointed out the link between Gariwo and the number of Rafael Lemkin, the Polish Jew who invented the notion of genocide and stressed the importance of intentionality and individual responsibility in genocides. Lemkin, said Nissim, convinced every country in the world to sign the 1948 United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. For this reason, Gariwo proposed to the Italian Parliament to improve Italy’s commitment to the prevention of all mass atrocities, which the UN Special adviser on the prevention of genocide welcomed.

The assembly saw a warm and active participation of Gariwoambassadors, who contributed to the event with thoughts and ideas. Milena Santerini, university professor at Cattolica University in Milan and national coordinator of the fight against anti-Semitism since 2020, praised Gariwo’s exceptional work and said: “GariwoThe mission of is something that lights the path of our society and provides us with an example of what it means to live as citizens, as a universal community: the Righteous do not divide, they help to unite and embody a society which is not polarized ”. Annalia guglielmi, Gariwo contributor and specialist in Eastern European history, underlined that “each totalitarian regime begins by annulling the memory of the Righteous. This is what is happening in Poland, where the Solidarność figures are prohibited: thus, the Righteous offer us a very important angle to reflect on the world of today ”.

Pietro kuciukian, co-founder of Gariwo and Honorary Consul of Armenia in Italy, mentioned the ongoing conflict in Tigray and said: “denial leads to impunity, and impunity leads to repeated genocides”. Mr. Kuciukian stressed the importance of Rafael Lemkin’s reflection on what it means to cancel a group when he invented the notion of genocide.

Bruno Marasà, former director of the European Parliament’s Milan office and foreign policy expert, suggested that Gariwo participate in the Conference on the future of Europe. Proposed by the European Commission and the European Parliament, the Conference on the Future of Europe was announced in 2019: it consists of a number of debates and initiatives to discuss the medium and long-term future of the EU and the reforms to be made to its policies and institutions.

Antonio Ferrari, columnist at Corriere della Sera, recalled the figure of Guelfo Zamboni, Italian consul in Thessaloniki who saved the many Italian and Greek Jews during the persecutions and who is honored at the Jardin des Righteous in Milan at the suggestion of Ferrari. Ferrari also mentioned the Rwandan genocide and the long-awaited apology from French President Emmanuel Macron, saying that a culture of prevention is fundamental. About Rwanda, Françoise Kankindi, president of Bene Rwanda (son of Rwanda), an association based in Italy, founded in 2005, and which works for reconciliation and the memory of the Rwandan genocide. Kankindi said that with Gariwo and Yolande Mukagasana (survivor and witness of the Rwandan genocide), she plans to open a Garden of the Righteous in Rwanda. “Rwanda – Kankindi said – was a proving ground to prove that the promise of ‘never again’ on which the 1948 Convention was built had not been crowned with success: the genocide of the Tutsi could be avoided and more than a million victims could be saved ”.

Cristina Miedico, an expert in cultural policy, mentioned the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, emphasizing the importance of cultural promotion, transmission of values, memory and cultural heritage. With a few colleagues, Miedico organized a series of meetings – to which Gabriele Nissim will also contribute – to highlight the importance of culture in the 2030 Agenda, which she says is lacking and could be incorporated into Goal 16, which promotes inclusive and peaceful societies.

Andrea Vitello, author of the forthcoming book “Il nazista che salvò gli ebrei. La storia del salvataggio degli ebrei danesi ”(Le lettere, Firenze, 2021), spoke of the ongoing atrocities in Xinjiang against the Uyghur Muslim minority. “The erasure of an entire people is literally in place: what is happening with the Uyghurs brings back memories of other well-known atrocities in modern history,” said Vitello. For this reason, he added, “I believe that the memory of the Righteous is essential: with genocides, there is often this narrative of the inevitable. The Righteous Teach Genocides with the idea that they could be avoided: it is always possible to do something against injustice ”.

Hafez Haidar, Lebanese writer, translator, academic and Candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2017, also contributed to the assembly of ambassadors of Gariwo. Haidar drew attention to what is currently happening in Lebanon, who Pplunged into an economic and political crisis after the August 2020 explosion in Beirut. “Lebanon must come to life on a new basis:” said Haidar, “we must close the arms factories and we must build a sustainable democracy based on human rights, by boycotting the economies that supply arms terrorists ”. Peace, Haidar said, is based on interfaith dialogue, not force.

Anna foa, historian, was inspired by the words of Gabriele Nissim on the plurality of voices on the theme of the Righteous across the world and across disciplines. “I believe that the moment today represents a step forward towards new efforts and challenges,” said Foa, “there is a need to delve deeper into these themes without fearing the plurality of voices, or any possible division.” Annamaria Samuelli, Gariwoco-founder and director of Gariwoeducation sector, concluded the assembly by focusing on Gariwothe growing commitment of prevent genocide. “Gariwothe education sector will take a concrete and enthusiastic position on this subject, with the thousands of students that we have engaged with the figures of the Righteous ”.



Source link

]]>
Fugro’s geo-data technology to “preserve” the prehistoric art of the Cosquer cave https://mact-asso.org/fugros-geo-data-technology-to-preserve-the-prehistoric-art-of-the-cosquer-cave/ Tue, 15 Jun 2021 18:55:10 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/fugros-geo-data-technology-to-preserve-the-prehistoric-art-of-the-cosquer-cave/ The Cosquer Cave Horse Panel, threatened by rising sea levels, was digitally “recorded” by Fugro at 0.1mm resolution. Image courtesy of Luc Vanrell Montpellier, France, June 15, 2021 – The French Ministry of Culture has awarded Fugro a new contract to complete the sweeping of the astonishing Cosquer cave, located in the Urgonian limestone of […]]]>


The Cosquer Cave Horse Panel, threatened by rising sea levels, was digitally “recorded” by Fugro at 0.1mm resolution. Image courtesy of Luc Vanrell

Montpellier, France, June 15, 2021 – The French Ministry of Culture has awarded Fugro a new contract to complete the sweeping of the astonishing Cosquer cave, located in the Urgonian limestone of Cap Morgiou near Marseille, France. Rising sea levels gradually erase the cave’s display of 177 exquisite and irreplaceable paintings and engravings, dating to 27,000 BC, but Fugro will use his geographic data scanning technology to create a permanent record of a enormous cultural significance.

In difficult conditions, and in collaboration with Immadras, a French professional diving company, Fugro will use the latest photogrammetric, 3D laser scanning and lighting technologies to scan and map the cave. The artwork above the surface is recorded in color and meticulous detail (0.1mm resolution), and a lower resolution will be used for the underwater section, which is approximately two-thirds of the cavity. Fugro will then produce a very precise georeferenced 3D model of the entire cave structure. This will provide valuable information for archaeological, paleontological and climatological research, and for future generations. Fugro will also model the landscape surrounding the entrance, 37m below sea level, as well as the narrow 120m submarine access tunnel leading to the cave. The project is expected to be completed early next year.

Luc Vanrell, Immadras project manager for scientific missions in the Cosquer cave, declared: “To achieve the objectives of a fully exploitable 3D digitization for our scientific team, we needed a supplier capable of mobilizing and develop multi-scale 3D surveying technologies, above and underwater. , and in extreme conditions. Fugro is the ideal partner to support us in this crucial mission.

Bertrand Chazaly, Fugro’s digital and 3D expert conducted Fugro’s first 3D survey in September 2010 and has since carried out more than 70 dives. In May, he returned to complete this urgent project with Luc Vanrell, which will require 45 additional dives and a careful approach to avoid damaging the beautifully preserved cave. “Many paintings of horses and hands are dangerously close to rising water levels,” Chazaly said. “Fugro’s job is to map and record these precious works of art before they are lost forever, and to model the underwater structure. Archaeologists will then use our geo-data to better understand how prehistoric humans lived in the cave and the positioning of the different groups of paintings.

About Fugro
Fugro is the world’s leading geodata specialist, collecting and analyzing comprehensive information about the Earth and the structures built on it. Taking an integrated approach that integrates geo-data acquisition and analysis and related advice, Fugro provides solutions. With expertise in site characterization and asset integrity, clients are supported in the safe, sustainable and efficient design, construction and operation of their assets throughout the lifecycle. Employing approximately 9,000 talented people in 61 countries, Fugro serves clients around the world, primarily in the energy and infrastructure sectors, both offshore and onshore. In 2020, sales amounted to 1.4 billion euros. Fugro is listed on Euronext Amsterdam.



Source link

]]>
‘Romance in Marseille’ a classic by Claude McKay https://mact-asso.org/romance-in-marseille-a-classic-by-claude-mckay/ Mon, 14 Jun 2021 21:10:42 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/romance-in-marseille-a-classic-by-claude-mckay/ Buried in the archives for nearly ninety years, Romance in Marseille by Claude McKay traces the adventures of a rowdy troop of dockers, prostitutes and political organizers – collectively straight and homosexual, disabled and able-bodied, Africans, Europeans, Caribbean and Americans. Set largely in the Old Port of Marseille, a mixture of cultures, at the height […]]]>


Buried in the archives for nearly ninety years, Romance in Marseille by Claude McKay traces the adventures of a rowdy troop of dockers, prostitutes and political organizers – collectively straight and homosexual, disabled and able-bodied, Africans, Europeans, Caribbean and Americans. Set largely in the Old Port of Marseille, a mixture of cultures, at the height of the jazz age, the novel takes off with Lafala, a seriously disabled but suddenly rich West African sailor. While boarding a transatlantic freighter, Lafala is discovered and locked in a freezing cupboard. Severely frozen by the time the boat docks, the once nimble dancer loses both of his lower legs, emerging from a rescue operation as what he calls “a man amputee.” Thanks to an unlikely successful lawsuit against the shipping company, however, Lafala scores big in the litigious United States. Feeling red after his legal payment, Lafala returns to Marseille and resumes his trans-African liaison with Aslima, a Moroccan courtesan. With its scenes of black bodies struggling for pleasure and freedom even when stolen, shipped, and sold for parts, McKay’s novel explores the legacy of slavery in a ruthless modern economy. This very first edition of Romance in Marseille includes an introduction by McKay academics Gary Edward Holcomb and William J. Maxwell which places the novel both in the “stowaway era” of black cultural politics and in the difficult career of McKay as a Harlem star and skeptic. Renaissance.

This Classic Penguin, Romance in Marseille is now available on www.blackbookstore.com



Source link

]]>
Veteran American documentary maker to receive directors’ award at Cannes https://mact-asso.org/veteran-american-documentary-maker-to-receive-directors-award-at-cannes/ Sun, 13 Jun 2021 09:56:30 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/veteran-american-documentary-maker-to-receive-directors-award-at-cannes/ Published on: 06/13/2021 – 11:56 The Directors’ Fortnight, now in its 53rd edition, has announced its official selection of films to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival. This year’s Carrosse d’Or winner, American director Frederick Wiseman, will present his 2018 film Monrovia, Indiana July 7. The Fortnight will also highlight its efforts to bring […]]]>


Published on:

The Directors’ Fortnight, now in its 53rd edition, has announced its official selection of films to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival. This year’s Carrosse d’Or winner, American director Frederick Wiseman, will present his 2018 film Monrovia, Indiana July 7. The Fortnight will also highlight its efforts to bring cinema to the public.

the Golden Coach This prize has been awarded since 2002 by the filmmakers of the Guild of French Directors in recognition of the specific talents and innovation of fellow filmmakers from around the world.

Previous winners include John Carpenter (2019), Alain Resnais (2014), Jane Campion (2013), Agnès Varda (2010), David Cronenberg (2006) and Clint Eastwood (2003).

In a press release, the GuildThe board of directors of, wrote that Frederick Wiseman’s “rich body of work” had left an “indelible mark in the history of cinema”.

Known for his observation of social institutions in the United States, such as hospitals, high schools, and police departments, Wiseman lets the images speak, avoiding over-storytelling.

The first feature film produced by Wiseman was The fresh world (1963). This was followed by Titicut Folies in 1967, which he produced and directed. He pursued a prolific career, producing and directing all of his works.

His most recent film was Town hall, which premiered at the 2020 Venice Film Festival last September.

Signs of hope

“No one has ever taken such a patient, humane, curious, understanding, empathetic and politically insightful look at the people and institutions that help, retain or reveal them,” the directors said of Wiseman’s career. , addressing him in their letter.

“Everywhere, in every setting, you have painted incredibly compelling portraits of people, doing their best, wherever they are in life. Small steps that offer hope for the older ones, the many facets of humanity on either side of a doctor, mayor, or police officer’s office, beating heart of living spaces, from parks to ski resorts, from universities to backstage theaters. “

Wiseman also directed and got involved in theater, in the United States and in France.

His 2018 film about a small American farming community, Monrovia Indiana, will be screened during the opening ceremony of the Fortnight on July 7, followed by a masterclass.

Among the 23 feature films of the Fortnight selection, seven are debut films, and 22 are from directors who have never been to Cannes before, among them the French director Yassine Qnia, with his film From low floor (A better future).

A name familiar to French audiences is writer / director Emmanuel Carrère with his film Ouistreham (Between Two Worlds), the opening opus of the Directors’ Fortnight, and its first film since 2005. It is based on the autobiographical experience of journalist Florence Aubenas, who lived six months in anonymity among workers affected by the crisis economic. Juliette Binoche plays the main role, surrounded by an amateur cast.

Actress Luàna Bajrami, who stood out as the 2019 winner Portrait of the girl on fire (Portrait of a Lady on Fire), will present her first feature film entitled Luaneshat e kodres (The hill where the lionesses roar).

Nine short films are on the program, as well as a special screening of The Remembrance Part II by British director Joanna Hogg. The highly anticipated sequel to the 2019 hit drama stars Honor Swinton Byrne, Tilda Swinton, and Charlie Heaton in the lead roles.

My Legionnaire (Our Men) by Rachel Lang is the closing film of the Fortnight.

Reach out to the community

La Quinzaine des Réalisateurs also prides itself on educational initiatives and community outreach as part of a program called the The Fortnight in Actions (La Quinzaine en Action), with activities throughout the year throughout France.

The program aims to introduce cinema to the population, in particular to young people from disadvantaged neighborhoods who do not have access to culture for geographic or financial reasons.

“Reduce inequalities in access to culture and reduce the exclusion felt by part of the population. Culture is not a luxury, it is essential to our well-being,” say the organizers of the Fortnight.

The films in the selection are screened followed by discussions with the directors.

During the festival, numerous screenings, workshops, readings and performances are planned at the Théâtre de la Licorne in the La Bocca district of Cannes.

One of these events will feature actresses recruited to interpret screenplays written by a group of eight women, supported by the Parcours de Femmes association, which professionally puts women back on their feet after a difficult period.

Young graduates of the CineFabrique group of the National Film School of Lyon will produce three of the scripts, with the collaboration of CinéFab and France Télévisions.

To maintain the festive spirit, the Fortnight also organizes reruns of its selected films in cities such as Brussels (in August), Marseille, and Paris (in September).

Poster designed by photographer and filmmaker Daniel Mercadante, is part of his series “The Enchanted Forest”, chosen for the Directors’ Fortnight at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival. © Directors’ Fortnight



Source link

]]>
The first official Harry Potter store has opened in New York https://mact-asso.org/the-first-official-harry-potter-store-has-opened-in-new-york/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 15:54:17 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/the-first-official-harry-potter-store-has-opened-in-new-york/ What is on offer? In Marseille, Paris or online, Harry Potter pop-up stores attract many fans of the universe. But for this New York boutique, the Wizarding world did everything. Of course, guests can still buy classic wand replicas and Gryffindor scarves, but the company wanted to go one step further in the kind of […]]]>


What is on offer?

In Marseille, Paris or online, Harry Potter pop-up stores attract many fans of the universe. But for this New York boutique, the Wizarding world did everything. Of course, guests can still buy classic wand replicas and Gryffindor scarves, but the company wanted to go one step further in the kind of products offered to enthusiasts who already own – almost – everything. On the menu? New designs, jewelry, creative pins, embroidered covers, themed nail polish and pretty tableware. The company is moving away from kitsch merchandising and turning to a more mature and versatile selection. It is now possible to own, or even wear, Harry potter merchandise without anyone noticing.

People shop at the world’s largest Harry Potter store when it opens to the public on June 3, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP)Angela Weiss / AFP

Among the most trendy pieces are the Spirit jerseys, oversized tops popular with pop culture fans, as well as Loungefly backpacks available in the colors of the Hogwarts houses, and even an authentic pack of butter beer. In fact, you can even enjoy one as a drink or ice cream at the boutique’s Butterbeer Bar, giving fans a refreshing break in this magical store.



Source link

]]>